Dalwood House Credit Effy Alexakis

Dalwood House. Credit: Effy Alexakis

10. Restoration of fabric that forms part of the significance of the item (significant fabric)

Restoration of fabric that forms part of the significance of the item (significant fabric)

This exemption is for restoration of an item by returning significant fabric to a known earlier location or revealing a known earlier significant configuration.

Examples of typical restoration activities/works include:

  • reassembling and returning significant fabric, such as a garden fountain to its original location.
  • reopening a closed pre-existing doorway that forms part of the item’s earlier significant configuration.

For more information on significance see the Significance and Significant Fabric fact sheet

Standard Exemption 10. Restoration of fabric that forms part of the significance of the item (significant fabric)

General conditions (see page 6 of Government Gazette) apply to the use of all Standard Exemptions and must be complied with. 

The following specified activities/works to an item do not require approval under subsection 57(1) of the Heritage Act 1977 if the specified activities/works are undertaken in accordance with each of the relevant standards prescribed below.

 Specified activities/works:

  1. Returning significant fabric, which has been removed or dislodged, to a known earlier location.
  2. Revealing a known earlier significant configuration, including reassembling existing elements or removing non-significant accretions and/or obstructions.

 Relevant standards:

  1. The specified activities/works must not involve damage to, or the removal of significant fabric.
  2. The specified activities/works must not introduce new material other than fixings and fastenings.
  3. Any new fixings and fastenings must use existing penetrations where possible.
  4. Any new penetrations must be:
    i. limited in number; and
    ii. made through non-significant fabric or mortar joints only.
  5. Activities/works to reveal a known earlier configuration must be guided by historical evidence for the earlier configuration of that item.
  6. Significant fabric must be identified as significant fabric in the listing on the State Heritage Register or the gazetted Interim Heritage Order, or a Conservation Management Plan, Conservation Management Strategy, Heritage Collections Plan, Archaeological Management Plan or Aboriginal Place Management Plan or identified as significant fabric in written advice prepared by a suitably qualified and experienced heritage professional.
  7. Revealing a known earlier configuration must be in accordance with the policies of a Conservation Management Plan, Conservation Management Strategy, Heritage Collections Plan, Archaeological Management Plan or Aboriginal Place Management Plan or identified as significant fabric in written advice prepared by a suitably qualified and experienced heritage professional.
  8. Non-significant accretions and/or obstructions must be identified as non-significant fabric in the listing on the State Heritage Register or the gazetted Interim Heritage Order, or a Conservation Management Plan, Conservation Management Strategy, Heritage Collections Plan, Archaeological Management Plan or Aboriginal Place Management Plan or identified as significant fabric in written advice prepared by a suitably qualified and experienced heritage professional, before it can be removed.
  9. Activities/works must be carried out by a suitably qualified person with heritage experience.